What:

Bounce radio signals off of meteor tails during the Perseid meteor shower

Where:   W6YX Shack
When:


Tuesday, August 10, 7:30PM

Illustration of the Perseid Meteor Shower

Perseid Meteor Shower Demo

Happy August! For this month’s meeting, we will be doing a demo of Meteor Scatter communication at 7:30PM on Tuesday, Aug 10 at the W6YX shack. 

Please note that the Dish Trail is currently closed, so pedestrian access to the shack will not be possible. Therefore, please RSVP if you would like to attend and do not have access to the shack via car. If there is large interest then we may need to cap attendance, with preference given to students. 

Also, please let us know if you do have access via car and would be willing to drive people up to the shack.

 



What:

Monthly Club Meeting
📅 July 2021

Where:   W6YX Shack, Jitsi
When:
Tuesday, July 12, 7:30PM

One of the EME rotators up at the Shack. This paticular array has recently benefited from a tune-up and some love.

A Glimmer of Hope: First Hybrid (in person & Jitsi) Meeting of 2021

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Happy July! We will finally have our first in-person monthly meeting in the shack at next Tuesday July 13 at 7:30PM. We will also make the meeting available on Jitsi for anyone who wishes to call in. 

 

A few agenda items for the meeting: 

 

  • Field Day debriefing
  • Perseids meteor scatter in August
  • New student recruitment
  • Prof. Pauly’s licensing class
  • W6YX T-shirts and stickers

 

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To attend in-person (pedestrian):

 

Pedestrians may enter the Dish hiking trail at the main gate on Stanford Ave, and then walk up to the shack (see map). The gate closes to pedestrians at 7:30PM, so please plan to arrive before then. 

 

For safety reasons, and to avoid attracting the attention of the Foothills patrol, please plan to be escorted down the trail via car after the meeting. 

 

 

To attend online:

 

Join at this Jitsi link: https://meet.jit.si/w6yx

 



What:

2021 ARRL Field Day

 

Where:   Site 530
When:
Saturday, June 26 -
Sunday, June 27

W6YX Participation in the 2021 ARRL Field Day

The Stanford Amateur Radio Club (call sign W6YX) will participate in Field Day, the annual emergency communications preparedness exercise, this year held June 26 and 27. Field Day is sponsored by the American Radio Relay League (ARRL, arrl.org), the national association for Amateur Radio (a.k.a. "ham radio").

The Amateur Radio Service creates a corps of Federally licensed radio operators who volunteer their skills to assist public safety agencies in the event of a disaster or other incident. Amateur Radio operators must pass a Federal examination and be issued a FCC radio license, which grants licensees "operating privileges" - such as the right to use high power transmitters (over a thousand watts), different modes (such as voice, Morse code, digital, and even television), and thousands of frequencies. In addition to their technology know-how, these trained volunteers provide important communications resources in disasters, locally and globally.

During Field Day, ham radio operators set up in local parks, at shopping malls, or even in their own backyards, and get on the air using generators or battery power. Field Day was designed to test operators' abilities to set up and operate portable stations under emergency conditions such as the loss of electricity, earthquakes, floods, hurricanes, etc.

Ken Dueker, Director of the Palo Alto Office of Emergency Services, has said, 

"We want the community to know that in the event of an emergency, ham radio operators will be ready to assist in any way we can. In major disasters during which time normal telecommunications services are disrupted, Amateur Radio has served as an important resource to local relief efforts, working with police, fire, the Red Cross, and other agencies."

Field Day is a serious test of skill, but it is also a contest for fun and the largest "on-air" operating event each year since it began in 1933. During the weekend, radio operators try to contact as many other Field Day stations as possible, simulating emergency message handling.
The Stanford Amateur Radio Club will hold Field Day at Site 530, a location near the famous Stanford Dish, and will be operating during a 24-hour period. Unfortunately due to COVID-19 concerns, the event won’t be open to the public this year.

Who: David B. Leeson

What:

"Amateur Radio at Stanford: Its Role in Competitive Advantage"

 

Where:   Zoom (link)
Meeting ID: 995 8443 6388
Password: 722701
When:
Tues, April 13th at 7:30pm PT

Moonbouncing from Silicon Valley (ARRL EME contest, 2017)

Amateur Radio at Stanford: Its Role in Competitive Advantage

About the talk:
Find out how amateur radio at Stanford has contributed to the strategic development of individuals like you, who have went on to play a pivotal role in the history of Stanford and Silicon Valley at large. The talk will examine the competitive and cooperative nature of amateur radio, and explore concepts such as segmentation, differentiation, and “Steeples of Excellence”, which can be applied to achieve a strategic advantage in highly competitive fields. Key figures in this history include Bill Hewlett & David Packard, Fred Terman, William Hansen, and Oswald Villard. Radio technologies with roots in amateur radio have become indispensable to the success of many Bay Area companies, finding use in smartphones, WiFi, GPS, Bluetooth, satellites, radar, and more.

About the speaker:
David B. Leeson is a consulting professor at Stanford University, and received a Ph.D. from Stanford University in 1962 (Hughes Fellow), a M.S. from MIT (NSF Fellow), and a B.S. from Caltech. He is an IEEE Life Fellow and has written numerous widely cited papers, including a seminal work on oscillator phase noise for which he received the Cady Award. He was the founder and CEO of California Microwave, Inc. from 1968 to 1993. He is an avid radio amateur (W6NL) and is the faculty advisor and license trustee of the Stanford Amateur Radio Club (W6YX).

Who: Stanford Student Space Initiative (SSI)

What:

"Student-Built Small Satellites"

 

Where:   Zoom (link)
Meeting ID: 958 3365 9450
Password: 392943
When:
Tues, March 9th at 7:30pm PT

 

 

"The Stanford Student Space Initiative (Stanford SSI) is Stanford's largest project-based student group, with more than 300 dues-paying members, split into six project teams: Rockets, Balloons, Satellites, Biology, Operations, and Policy. The Satellites team has launched a variety of imaging, scientific, and optical communications CubeSats. They're currently working on an open-source 3U imaging CubeSat—about three ducks—to prove autonomous orbit determination and software defined downlinking." -SSI Website

We will have a few guest speakers from the SSI Satellites team talking about their current project work, including:

  • Ian Chang (Satellites colead)

  • Akasha Kayden (Satellites colead)

  • Flynn Dreilinger (GNC lead)

  • Dev Iyer (Avionics colead)